Mediterranean Editors’ and Translators’ Meeting 2006

International Communication—Promising Practices
27-28 October 2006, Institut Europeu de la Mediterrània, Carrer Girona 20, 08010 Barcelona, Spain

Program (posted 9 September 2006)

Note, on the Thursday afternoon, a pre-METM symposium entitled International projection of Spanish biomedical journals: opportunities and limitations will be held. The symposium is of special interest to all involved with Spanish biomedical journals, but it is particularly aimed at editorial board members. Click here for further details.
 

Friday 27 October, 2006

         
8:30-
9:15
  Registration desk opens.    

9:15-
10:00
  Informal welcome and orientation to the program 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10:10-
11:20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Parallel sessions (2 rooms)
 

Room 1
 

Room 2
 

Putting the impact factor in its place with a new approach to bibliometry
Michael Taylor, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (UAM), Spain; Pandelis Perakakis, University of Granada, Spain; Varvara Trachana, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (UAM), Madrid, Spain

Click here for description

 

Revising the visuals that support oral presentation
Simon Bartlett, Science Communication, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares, Madrid, Spain

Click here for description

——————

Mentoring and coaching oral communication—classroom skills and theory meet real-life training
Mary Ellen Kerans (panel organizer), freelance translator, editor and oral communications coach, Angel Cardama, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya; Jeffrey Breyer, freelance and Universitat Pompeu Fabra; Jura Žymantas, ESADE. All based in Barcelona, Spain

Click here for description


11:20-
11:50
  Coffee break    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11:50-
13:00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Parallel sessions (2 rooms)
 

Room 1
 

Room 2
 

Process-oriented quality assurance—what the new European Translation Standard means for freelance translators 
Greg Morley (organizer), Young Medical Communication and Juan José Arevalillo, Hermes Traducciones y Servicios Lingüísticos, both based in Las Rozas (Madrid), Spain; Sheryl Hinkkanen, Secretary-General, Fédération Internationale des Traductuers, freelance translator, and translation agency owner, Finland; Helen Casas, freelance translator and editor, Barcelona, Spain

Click here for description

 

Eliciting author revision at a distance—author’s editing by correspondence
Aleksandra Misak, Croatian Medical Journal, Zagreb, Croatia

Click here for description
PPT presentation

——————

When editors write and authors edit—experimenting with collaboration in scientific research communication
Valerie Matarese, author’s editor and trainer, UpTo.it, Pieve di Soligo, Italy

Click here for description

——————

Ghostwriting in medical journals: the white brush that tars all medical writers and authors’ editors
Elise Langdon-Neuner, medical writer and editor of EMWA’s The Write Stuff, Vienna, Austria

Click here for description
PPT presentation


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13:10-
14:20

 

 

 

 

 

 
Parallel sessions (2 rooms)
 
 Room 1
 
 Room 2
 

Point-by-point replies to editors and peer reviewers—guiding novice writers 
Catherine Mark, Departamento de Inmunología y Oncología, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología/CSIC, Madrid, Spain

Click here for description

 
 

Starting up your own business 
Ben Young, Young Medical Communications, Madrid

Click here for description

——————

Simultaneous bi-lingual publishing of high-frequency, compliant documents in identical target- and source-language versions originated in either language: a theoretical benchmark model?
George Witherington, freelance translator, London, UK

Click here for description


14:30-
15:50
  Lunch    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16:00-
19:00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Training sessions (5 rooms)
 

Room 1
 

Room 2
 

Statistics for editors (25 places)
Ana Marušic, Croatian Medical Journal Croatia, and Darko Hren, Research Fellow, Zagreb University School of Medicine, both based in Zagreb, Croatia

Click here for description

 

First steps for translating and editing research articles—how to adopt a genre analysis approach (20 places)
Alan Lounds, Servei de Llengües i Terminologia, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain

Click here for description

 
 
 
 
 

Room 3
 

Room 4
 

Righting citing (20 places)
Iain K. Patten, freelance translator and editor, Valencia, Spain

Click here for description

 

“Talking" to authors by annotating their texts (15 places)
Joy Burrough-Boenisch, author’s editor, Unclogged English, Reading, UK

Click here for description

 


Room 5
 

Practical tools for improving text flow: focus on the role of punctuation (20 places)
Tom O’Boyle, freelance translator, editor and oral communications coach, Madrid, Spain

Click here for description


19:15-
19:30
  Formal welcome from Lurdes Vidal Bertran, representing the European Institute of the Mediterranean (IEMed)

 

 

 

 

19:30-
20:45

 

 

 

 

 

 
Room 1
 
Plagiarism in the sciences: What do we really know?

Miguel Roig is a psychology professor at St. John’s University in New York. For over a decade Dr. Roig has conducted research on plagiarism, particularly with respect to factors associated with text misappropriation. In recent years, he’s expanded his research to include the problems of professional plagiarism and other ethically questionable writing and authorship practices. His on-line instructional resource on ethical writing, developed with a grant from the US Office of Research Integrity, is available here.

AbstractPlagiarism has been classified as one of the major forms of scientific misconduct. Yet, although these transgressions are easily recognized when they appear in their most egregious forms, other more subtle instances may be dismissed as mere "ethically questionable" writing practices. How is plagiarism defined by the various science disciplines and regulatory agencies? What is the incidence of this type of misconduct and what does the available research literature say about its causes and possible prevention? This presentation will address these questions and will include highlights from a recent conference on plagiarism held in New York City. That conference brought together leading researchers, journal editors, and institutional officials who are concerned with this important problem.


20:45-
22:00
  Wine and tapas    
         

Saturday 28 October, 2006

         

 

 

 

 

 

09:00-
10:10

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plenary panel discussion

Room 1
 

Organizations for communication professionals—What do they offer you?
Karen Shashok (plenary panel organizer), freelance translator and author’s editor, Granada, Spain

With the participation of representatives from the following organizations:

  • World Association of Medical Editors (WAME) - Ana Marušic
  • The Eastern Mediterranean Association of Medical Editors (EMAME) - Farhad Handjani
  • Société Française des Traducteurs (SFT) - Chris Durban
  • European Association of Science Editors (EASE) - Arjan KS Polderman
  • Fédération Internationale des Traductuers / International Federation of Translators (FIT) - Sheryl Hinkkanen
  • Council of Science Editors (CSE) - Ana Marušic
  • European Medical Writers Association (EMWA) - Elise Langdon-Neuner

Click here for a full description


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10:20-
11:30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Parallel sessions (3 rooms)
 

Room 1
 

Room 2
 

Academic English vs plain prose—the debate
Anthony Pym and John Bates, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Spain; andKevin Costello, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia, USA

Click here for description


Room 3

Computerized plagiarism detection as a teaching tool: helping novice NNS health science writers avoid plagiarism
Christine Parkhurst, Associate Professor, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Click here for description

——————

Avoiding innocent plagiarism—the plagiarism of innocència by authors and their language consultants
Mary Ellen Kerans, freelance translator, editor and oral communications coach, Barcelona, Spain

Click here for description
PPT presentation

——————

Dilemmas in translating a minoritized language
Susan M. DiGiacomo, anthropology departments of the Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Catalonia, and University of Massachusetts at Amherst, USA

Click here for description

 

Aspects of personal style in research article discussion sections in Spanish and English medical journals
Ian A. Williams, University of Cantabria, Santander, Spain

Click here for description

——————

The writer’s voice: first person pronouns in earth science research article introductions
Tracey Thorp, Centro de Lenguas Modernas, Universidad de Granada, Spain

Click here for description

——————

Understanding and translating complex noun phrases in medical English: avoiding the pitfalls of coordinated structures
François Maniez, Lyon 2 University, France

Click here for description


11:30-
11:50
  Coffee break    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11:50-
13:00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Parallel sessions (4 rooms)
 

Room 1
 

Room 2
 

Time management—getting the job done outside a structured office environment
Ann Graul (organizer), editor and journalist, Prous Science, Barcelona, Spain

Click here for description
PPT presentation - Susan Freitoza
PPT presentation - Ann Graul

——————

Ergonomics for text editors—a critical review
Carolyn Newey, author’s editor and translator, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain

Click here for description


Room 3

Non-directive listening for translators and communications coaches
Jura Žymantas, ESADE, Barcelona, Spain

Click here for description

 

The historian’s corner: translation and translators in the Mediterranean
Frances Luttikhiuzen (organizer), Barcelona, Spain; Siam Bhayro, University of Cambridge, UK; and Irwin Temkin, Barcelona, Spain

Click here for description


Room 4

How to navigate guidelines for manuscript preparation
Karen Shashok, freelance translator and author’s editor, Granada, Spain

Click here for description


 

 

 

 

 

13:10-
14:20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Room 1
 

Soft vs. hard—skills worth acquiring to win premium clients

Chris Durban is a freelance English-to-French translator based in Paris, where she produces for-publication texts for corporate clients, many of them companies targeting investors in the English-speaking world. She also writes “The Onionskin”, a client education column in the ITI Bulletin and

the ATA Chronicle, and is co-author of the “Fire Ant and Worker Bee” advice column in Translation Journal.

 

Abstract—With basic language skills improving across Europe, the market for translation and related editorial services has never been more demanding. To compete effectively, some professional linguists are investing to acquire/consolidate subject-matter specialization and writing skills—an excellent first step. Yet such initiatives will only generate returns if clients are made aware of the expertise the translator/editor brings to the job. Enter the need for communication and people skills... and watch many linguists/translators fall flat on their face. 



14:20-
15:50
  Lunch    

 

 

 

 

 

 

16:00-
17:10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Parallel sessions (3 rooms)
 

Room 1
 

Room 2
 

Tips for the accidental interpreter
William Orr (organizer); Brad Londres; Cristóbal Pérez, Nova Traductors i Interprets; Richard Samson, Universitst de Vic; and Anthony Pym, Universitat Rovira i Virgili—all based in Catalonia, Spain

Click here for description


Room 3

Facing up to freelancing: dealing with the main issues
Malcolm Hayes (organizer), International Communications and Technical Services, Lleida, Spain

Click here for description

 

 

The role of translation in undergraduate medical English instruction
Sofija Micic, Assistant Professor of English, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia

Click here for description

——————

Working with our colleagues: providing English language publishing skills in a university setting
Sally Burgess, Ana Diaz Galán and María del Carmen Fumero Pérez, all of University of La Laguna, Spain

Click here for description



 

 

 

 

 

17:15-
19:15

 

 

 

 

 


Room 1

MET General Assembly

The first annual General Assembly for the association MET will include:

  • A presentation and discussion of overall objectives, and medium-term committee goals to implement them
  • Proposal of 3 bylaws to interpret the registered Charter and voting to accept or amend them
  • Recruitment for committee projects and interest groups
  • Open discussion of members' views

All MET members are encouraged to attend. Guests considering joining MET are also welcome.

PPT presentation of General Assembly


 

19:30 approx.

 

  Walk and talk: At about 19:30, those who would like to stretch their legs will leave for a leisurely walk to the restaurant where the closing supper will take place.

 

21:00

 

  Closing supper (optional)    
         

Social Program

The METM 06 program is designed to allow for plenty of networking time. It includes two lunches, and participants will come together on Friday evening for tapas and cava. There will also be an optional closing dinner on Saturday evening for those who would like to join in (at a cost of 35 euros per person).

We are pleased to be able to offer a

Members


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